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Ghanaian Election: Opposition Rejects Results On Presidential Election

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Ghana’s main opposition party, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) has rejected the results of Monday’s presidential election, declaring incumbent President Nana Akufo Dankwa Addo the winner.

He received 6,730,413 votes, 51 percent of the total number of votes required for a candidate to win, while his opponent John Dramani Mahama, a former president, received 6,214,889 votes, or 47 percent in 100.

John Mahama’s right-hand man, Haruna Iddrisu, said his party would not accept the results because of evidence of electoral fraud.

“We look forward to taking action on the outcome of the presidential and parliamentary elections, and working to eliminate this scandal, which is an attack on our democracy,” he said.

In his victory speech on Wednesday, President-elect Nana Akufo Addo called on the people to join forces with his government to move the country forward.

Foreign observers view the election as peaceful, although five people were killed and 19 injured in violence related to the election.

Things took a turn for the worse after opposition candidate John Dramani Mahama accused the government of trying to rig the election.

Mahama, 62, has accused President Akufo Addo of using the military in a bid to sabotage the election, which his government has denied.

“It is not right to use the military to change the outcome of elections in areas where you have not won, so we will not stand idly by and watch the Ghanaian people lose their rights.

There have been few allegations of fraud in Ghana, the world’s largest gold producer and one of the world’s most democratic.

In the last vote in 2016, Mahama conceded defeat to President Nana Akufo-Addo before the final count was announced.

The Ghana Electoral Commission (GEC) said it had delayed the official results until Wednesday in a bid to eliminate any possible problems.

Ghana is considered one of the most democratic countries in Africa.

To this day supporters of the incumbent president continue to celebrate in parts of the country, calling for national unity and creating more development projects.

The president-elect is now facing significant challenges, especially in the face of the country’s economic crisis and the creation of youth employment.

Since 1992, when the country’s constitution was amended, Ghana has been able to hand over power peacefully, despite criticism of the results.